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Yarrow: If it’s good enough for Achilles, it’s good enough for me

I know, I go on and on about the Comfrey in my products and how much of a Magical herb that it is, which of course is true. However, there are also other herbs that are also pretty magical too. And one of them is Yarrow.

Yarrow tried and tested on live Battlefields:

Yarrow’s history is equally rich – thanks to some big time celebrity sponsored marketing by a dude called ‘Achilles’.  This is reflected in Yarrow’s Botanical name; Achillea Millefolium, the first part of the name honours ‘Achilles’ who is said to have used it on the battlefield during the Trojan War to control the bleeding and heal the wounds of his soldiers.  The second part is ‘thousand of leaves’, due to the feathery amount of leaves that it has.

Rumour even has it among some, that it got its name when Achilles covered himself in Yarrow tincture all over but missed his ankle – the rest they say is legend – personally, I think this might be a good PR spin at its finest.

Nor can I imagine a warrior with the reputation of Achilles was really running around and seeing to his armies wounds.  I do imagine that he had a jolly good medical man/ herbalist along. As an ambulance, morphine shot and a plaster cast weren’t available.  A battlefield would be the perfect place to test the worthiness of a herbalist’s own character and that of his herbs.

So, I am apt to believe that Yarrow won out as the go-to herb on the battlefield, and hence carries the name of Achilles evermore – a long-lasting claim to fame.  Its nicknames are nosebleed, military herb, which also says it all.

Why it won Achilles stamp of approval:

The reason it would have been used is due ability to staunch bleeding rapidly making it a great garden bandaid. This is due to its complex chemical components two of which are achilletine and achilleine which makes the blood coagulate and speeds up the healing of wounds. It is also said to be antiseptic, anti-inflammatory and anti-spasmodic, three other qualities that would come in handy if you’d had your arm cut off in battle.

As good Ole’ Culpeper says “Ointment of the leaves cures wounds, and is good for inflammation, ulcers, fistulas and all such runnings as abound with moisture.”

It’s also been known to calm down the skin, and great for rash, itchiness and dry skin. And it can be used internally to bring down a fever, allergies, sinus issues, to calm menstrual bleeding, stomach issues and better circulation.

Pretty magic, if you ask me, which is why I choose to use it in supporting Comfrey to create the base that I use for my products. I figure if it’s good enough for Achilles and his armies it’s good enough for me.

Shepherds Alchemy Comfrey Products

Shepherds Alchemy Comfrey Products

You can find the Yarrow in the Shepherds Alchemy Product Range:

Wayfarers Magic: Comfrey Ointment
Sadhu Rose: Rose + Comfrey Ointment
Bedouin’s Charm: Comfrey + Coconut + Grapefruit Body/ Bath oil
Eternal Serenity: Comfrey + Argan + Hemp Face Oil

“This is my first time using a body oil and I LOVE IT. It is a treat to the body and senses -- feels great on the skin and smells delicious. As it is important to know what I'm applying on my skin and then washing out into the environment, this body oil is made of natural ingredients and I appreciate that. I look forward to pampering my skin daily now after a shower. Thanks, Michelle”.

Juanita

Resources used:

www.herbwisdom.com
Rodale’s 21st-Century Herbal: A Practical Guide for Healthy Living Using Nature’s Most Powerful Plants
Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine: The Definitive Home Reference Guide to 550 Key Herbs with all their Uses as Remedies for Common Ailments
Culpeper’s Complete Herbal: Over 400 Herbs and Their Uses